See the Wild Dog That Urinates In a Weird Way | National Geographic

Dholes are endangered wild dogs native to India that have some interesting hidden talents.
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See the Wild Dog That Urinates In a Weird Way | National Geographic

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Adorable Lemurs Roam Free on This Ancient Island | Short Film Showcase

In Madagascar, a small piece of rainforest holds an inspiring conservation story. See how a group of local people have banded together to protect the island’s much-loved ring-tailed lemur in this short film by Robin Hoskyns.
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The Short Film Showcase spotlights exceptional short videos created by filmmakers from around the web and selected by National Geographic editors. We look for work that affirms National Geographic’s belief in the power of science, exploration, and storytelling to change the world. The filmmakers created the content presented, and the opinions expressed are their own, not those of National Geographic Partners.

Know of a great short film that should be part of our Showcase? Email sfs@natgeo.com to submit a video for consideration. See more from National Geographic’s Short Film Showcase at http://documentary.com

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Since the year 2000, ring-tailed lemur populations on the island have dropped more than 95 percent. Rapid habitat loss, hunting, and the illegal pet trade have all contributed to the species’ dramatic decline. Looking to turn things around, a group of local people have banded together to protect their much-loved maki. Due to their hard work, the Anja Community Reserve now boasts the highest density of ring-tailed lemurs in the whole of the island. See the animals at play in their island oasis in this inspiring short film by Robin Hoskyns.

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Adorable Lemurs Roam Free on This Ancient Island | Short Film Showcase

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Rescued Bear With Amputated Paws Learns to Walk Again | National Geographic

An Asian black bear with two amputated front paws arrived safely at a new sanctuary in north-east Vietnam.
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Hai Chan was rescued by FOUR PAWS, an international animal welfare group, after being held captive for ten years as a bile bear. Bear stomach bile is harvested and used in traditional Chinese medicine. Hai Chan suffered enlarged adrenal glands, stress, and the two amputated paws. The paws were most likely used to produce bear paw wine. Two other Asian bears were rescued and brought to the sanctuary.

Read more about the rescue: https://news.nationalgeographic.com/2017/12/bear-bile-paw-wine-rescue-vietnam/

Rescued Bear With Amputated Paws Learns to Walk Again | National Geographic

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Brain Surgery Helps a Rescued Fur Seal | National Geographic

A northern fur seal named Ziggy Star has undergone groundbreaking medical treatment.
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Learn more about Ziggy’s story here: http://bit.ly/2CDJaSU

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Ziggy arrived at Connecticut’s Mystic Aquarium after rescuers from The Marine Mammal Center found her stranded in the San Francisco Bay area. MRI scans showed a brain disorder causing seizures, preventing a return to the wild. Despite treatment, symptoms worsened and fluid filled her brain. Ane Uriarte of Tufts University developed a plan for surgery. Vets had treated fluid filling into the brain—hydrocephalus—in cats and dogs. But seals had never been treated for the condition. Veterinarian Jen Flower reports Ziggy Star is now eating and swimming normally at Mystic Aquarium, where she inspires much affection.

Read more about Ziggy Star in “First-of-Its-Kind Brain Surgery Saves Beloved Fur Seal”
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Brain Surgery Helps a Rescued Fur Seal | National Geographic

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Soar Alongside Migrating Birds—and the Man Who Flies With Them | National Geographic

For more than 20 years, Christian Moullec has guided migrating flocks of vulnerable bird species with his microlight aircraft.
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With his microlight aircraft, he guides migrating flocks of vulnerable species. Moullec, known as the “birdman,” raises orphaned geese at his home in France, and leads them on safe migratory routes. Now, Moullec also takes visitors on short trips to share his moving experience with the birds. The tourists help to keep his conservation project running.

READ: Stunning Video Shows a Man Flying With Birds
https://news.nationalgeographic.com/2018/01/bird-man-flying-france-microlight-spd

Soar Alongside Migrating Birds—and the Man Who Flies With Them | National Geographic

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See ‘Underwater Snowstorm’ of Coral Reproducing | National Geographic

This is what it looks like when coral spawns in the Great Barrier Reef.
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The timing of spawns depends on water temperature, time of day, and moon phases. Once a year when the water is warm and the moon is full, the coral colonies simultaneously release male and female genetic material. The cells float to the surface and combine into larvae that will eventually turn into new coral colonies.

Click here to read more: https://www.nationalgeographic.com/photography/proof/2017/12/coral-spawning-reproduction-great-barrier-reef/

See ‘Underwater Snowstorm’ of Coral Reproducing | National Geographic

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Rising Temperatures Cause Sea Turtles to Turn Female | National Geographic

Warming temperatures off the coasts of Australia may be having a devastating effect on green sea turtle populations by turning almost all their offspring into females.
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Sex in sea turtles is determined by the heat of the sand the eggs incubate in. As temperatures rise due to climate change, more and more females are being born. On Raine Island, the Pacific Ocean’s largest and most important green sea turtle rookery scientists found that female sea turtles now outnumber males 116 to 1. Raine appears to have been producing almost exclusively females for at least 20 years. It’s unclear how turtles are affected worldwide, and other factors like habitat changes may play a role in shifting sex ratios.

Read more in “99% of These Sea Turtles Are Turning Female—Here’s Why”
https://news.nationalgeographic.com/2018/01/australia-green-sea-turtles-turning-female-climate-change-raine-island-sex-temperature/

Rising Temperatures Cause Sea Turtles to Turn Female | National Geographic

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Was This Whale Trying to Save a Diver’s Life? | National Geographic

Biologist Nan Hauser believes that when a humpback whale approached her and started nudging, lifting, and covering, it was acting to protect her from a nearby tiger shark.
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A biologist who’s spent nearly three decades studying humpback whale, Nan Hauser never experienced an encounter like the one in September 2017. For ten minutes, the barnacle-knobbed humpback nudged her, lifted her out of the water, and swept her under its pectoral fin. She thought the whale might kill her. But once she was aboard her boat, she saw a tiger shark in the vicinity. Hauser thinks the whale was trying to protect her. The claim was met with skepticism by Hauser’s peers, and she understands their hesitation. But humpback whales do rescue animals—both other humpbacks and other species—from predators. The reasons for this behavior aren’t fully known. Her first-person footage puts you right where Hauser was. But it’s nearly impossible to know the humpback’s real motivation.

Read more in “Whale Allegedly Protects Diver From Shark, But Questions Remain”
https://news.nationalgeographic.com/2018/01/whale-protects-diver-from-shark-video-spd/

Was This Whale Trying to Save a Diver’s Life? | National Geographic

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Meet the Intimidating Eel That Mates For Life | National Geographic

Wolf eels are master predators that live in the North Pacific.
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Meet the Intimidating Eel That Mates For Life | National Geographic

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Rescuing Croc with Tire Wrapped Around Neck is a Race Against Time | National Geographic

Indonesian rescuers are racing against time to save a saltwater crocodile that has a tire wrapped around its neck.
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First spotted in 2016 on a Palu riverbank in Indonesia, the 13-foot long reptile was recently spotted again, as this footage shows. The Central Sulawesi Natural Resource Conservation Agency is coordinating rescue efforts by trying to lure the crocodile with bait but so far those attempts have been unsuccessful. Rescuers fear that if the tire is not removed soon, it will strangle the crocodile in the next few months because of its growing body.

Rescuing Croc with Tire Wrapped Around Neck is a Race Against Time | National Geographic

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